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Why are People Obsessed with Coconuts?

The darling of the health and wellness industry is versatile, sweet, anti-inflammatory, and abundant here in the Dominican Republic. And why else are they so popular? First of all, coconuts include minerals to support hydration. This is key to maintaining your health in a tropical climate! Coconut also serves as an immunity booster. The anti-bacterial, anti-fungal and anti-viral activities of coconuts allow them to fight against common infections that attack the body. The best way to get the immune boosting benefits of coconut is by consuming both the flesh of the coconut and the water. And besides the health benefits, there’s the delicious taste!!!

At Taino Organic Farm we love to make coconut milk. This is a wonderful option for a dairy replacement that is home made, organic and nutrient dense. We use it in our coffee and as a base for smoothies, soups, cookies, ice cream and more. Coconut milk makes our food creamier and when you know all the benefits it has for your body, of course you will want to eat as much as possible!

11350106_10205327800692057_878393907_nHealth Benefits

  • Helps the body maintain proper blood sugar levels
  • Keeps blood vessels and skin elastic and flexible (contains 50{f2973bc577a195c35cdcad3730db5f6ced97ed67eb120151c538413472fe3d08} copper)
  • Strong bones (rich in phosphorus)
  • Relaxes nerves and muscles (magnesium)
  • It helps in weight control (fiber)
  • Reduces the risk of inflammation of the joints (selenium)
  • Lowers high blood pressure potassium
  • Supports prostate (mineral Zinc)

As nutrition junkies, we are living to create vibrant health! The Finca is delighted to share this simple, delicious, locally sourced recipe with you. So easy, so tasty and so healthy.

Coconut Milk Recipe

Yield: 24 oz depending on size of coconuts


  • Water and flesh from 3 coconuts (Ask a local to help open the coconuts as they know what they’re doing … keeping all of our fingers is important to us!)
  • Vanilla
  • Himalayan Salt


Simply combine all ingredients together and blend until desired consistency



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Taino Primal Coffee

Here at Finca Taino we get up early to harvest and work in the garden before it gets too hot, so this quick and easy breakfast treat is ideal. This is a strong, whole foods blend that creates a “euphoric” feeling. Perfect as a pre-workout supplement or in our case, pre-harvest! Trust us, 6 AM isn’t fun for anyone, but this drink makes us smile.

What are the key players and why do they optimize our health?

Coffee – a rich source of antioxidants and a clean source of caffeine

Pastured eggs – dense with micro-nutrients, brain boosting fats, complete protein

Coconut oil– healthy medium chain triglycerides that helps your body burn more calories, feel fuller for longer, and boosts brain function

*Think of this as a whole foods protein shake to supplement a busy morning*

Processed with Moldiv



Serves 2

2 Pastured Eggs (from our Taino Farm chickens)

16 oz Coffee

1tsp Vanilla

2 tsp Coconut Oil

Cinnamon and Himalayan Salt to taste

*optional: liquid Stevia drops and Turmeric


 Brew coffee as you normally would. Pour coffee, vanilla, coconut oil, pastured eggs, cinnamon and a pinch of salt into blender. Blend or pulse on low until frothy. Be careful and hold the lid of the blender down, as blending hot ingredients creates an air pressure build up. This coffee is DELICIOUS and foamy. It should be consumed fairly quickly as it tends to separate as it cools.



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What We Can Learn from Sounds

When I am back at school, I am plugged in. I can picture myself so vividly – crouching over a little cubicle desk. I am staring at my computer – working on a paper or maybe a problem set. I am distracted from my work only by other things popping up on a screen in front of me – a facebook notification or a text message. But nothing around me draws my eyes away from my thirteen inch computer screen. My headphones are playing some genre of music into my ears, masking the sounds of the world around me – of people flowing in and out of the library. Maybe a friend has passed by…I wouldn’t notice.

When I am back at school, I am plugged in. I am using tangled headphones connecting my phone in my pocket to my ears as I walk to class. Sometimes, if I am in a “loving life” type of mood, I will listen to country. Isn’t that ironic? I am loving life yet so definitively severing myself off from it.

When I am back at school, I am plugged in. I am lying in bed with my white noise machine on. It blurs all the sounds around me. I can’t even hear my breathing or the soft and steady beating of my heart, just the white noise that fills my ears and dulls my senses.

It is different here.

11430292_10154025875853009_1074470989_nWhen I run in the morning in Los Brazos, the small Dominican town in which Taino Organic Farm is located, I don’t use my headphones. I can hear my breath, the soft gallop of Piggy–the loyal farm dog of Finca Taino, the roosters talking to each other across the valley, the moos of the various cows we pass, the occasional “hola” from the early risers sitting on their porches enjoying the first yellow light of the day, the squeals of pigs (they didn’t sound particularly happy to be waking up), the sound of the wind and the subsequent elegant sway of the green that surrounded me. There are an infinite amount of sounds at any point in time, no matter where you are in this world. We can’t hear all of them–we couldn’t possibly. But that’s not a reason to miss the beautiful ones that we can hear.

When I go to bed at night at Finca Taino it seems that everyone around me is having their bedside chat with each other. I fall asleep to the occasional heehaw of the donkey who lives a floor down from me, to the chitter chatter of the chickens, the wind, the insects enveloped by the dark sky, the sound of far-away bachata dance music, a moto zooming by – a night just beginning or ending.



When I wake up at Finca Taino it is early – 5:50 typically. It seems the world is wide awake and the light is just beginning to illuminate the world. I think it would be wrong to be frustrated by this, to be mad at the light and and the creatures for waking me up. It would be sad for these early morning sounds to anger me.

“Wake up grateful”; I read that somewhere recently. It is so easy to do that here.

At home I wake up to my alarm clock as well. It typically goes off around 6:15. In the winter, it would be dark still. It’s not the early morning blue kind of dark, but a black – an endless thick black – dark that makes the morning feel so far away. Even still, there were so many reasons to be grateful to be jolted awake by the alarming noise coming from my phone.

11638002_10154025875813009_430329023_nHere, waking up to the sound of the rest of the world, to the light streaming through my window–that is such an easy, obvious, and accessible reason to be grateful. It is so easy that gratitude is becoming a habit – almost an instinct. That is what nature can do; that is what can happen when I am no longer plugged in.

I think that when I return home, back to school, back to the “grind” after two months here in Los Brazos and Cabarete on the North Coast of the Dominican Republic, it will be hard not to wake up grateful. A hard habit to break.


Drip Irrigation in the Caribbean

Farming in the Dominican Republic requires a lot of watering. Drip irrigation reduces the amount of water used and the time spent hand watering.

To keep the pressure constant, the aim is to create a circular drip irrigation system that can have sections shut off when not in use. Long lengths of pipe that don’t rejoin the main loop are bad because they reduce pressure.

diagram 1


main garden


These are the beds we want to irrigate. The red stars mark the taps we would use to feed water into the system.

We  run 1/2 inch black irrigation pipe over grow beds and under the mulch burying it under the paths to avoid the connecting section becoming a hazard.

The model looks something like this:



For plants that are close to the pipe we use drippers  (usually 0.5 gallon per hour) which plug straight into main pipe which look like this:


You can see here that the plant is so close to the pipe that the water will be going directly to the soil around it.

If a plant is more than half an inch from the pipe we run macro tubes off the main line to the plants with a dripper on the end to bring the water from the main pipe to the plant.



When we have smaller plants closer together (for example leafy greens like Arugula) it’s not worth putting in that many drippers, so instead we use ½ inch porous soaker hose which slowly releases 100 gallons/hour per 100m. We put in two lines per bed to reach a wider area, using a T shape connector.



As we rotate the plants grown in each bed we can easily switch between the soak hose and the regular pipe with drippers (for example, eggplants would use drippers as they are larger and planted far apart whereas arugula would use soak hose as they are small and planted close together).

You can easily add sections to your system too as long as they follow the rule of always rejoining the main loop.
Our Tips:

  • Do a quick drawing of your garden layout with measurements, so you know where you are going to start and finish, which sections you want to be able to turn off and how much of all your materials you will need.
  • Run timers on your taps to be sure not to forget to turn them off ($15-50 depending on how complex you want to make your system)
  • Bury the pipes between beds to avoid tripping on them and running over them too much with wheelbarrows
  • Lay out lengths of the tubing to heat up in the sun – it helps straighten them out from the coil and makes it easier to work with (Old landscaper’s tip!)

Overall, make sure you have some good cutters, a tape measure and a plan.

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Plantain Power: How to Make Mangú

What are plantains? This Caribbean staple is a member of the banana family. Green plantains are lower in sugar and starchier (read: not sweet!) than the traditional banana. They are a great source of dense carbohydrates, soluble fiber, vitamins, magnesium and potassium – nutrients that are essential in tropical climates as they help to restore electrolyte balance.

There are many ways to get plantains on your plate – grilled, baked, or fried. At Taino Organic Farm, our favorite combination is to serve garlic mangú topped with spicy scrambled eggs on a bed of freshly picked greens. The best part about this meal is that all of the ingredients can be found within steps of our sustainable farm’s kitchen!

Mangú Recipe

Ingredients- Serves 4

  • Green Plantains (2-3 per person)
  • 4 cloves garlic
  • 1/2 Cup chopped red onion
  • 1/4 Cup chopped garlic chives
  • 2 Tbsp butter
  • 1/4 Cup raw milk
  • Salt to taste


  1. Slit sides of green plantains
  2. Boil plantains with the skin ON for 10 minutes or until skin is tender
  3. Carefully peel skin off plantains and slice into 1/4 inch pieces
  4. Continue to boil until soft
  5. Add garlic, onions, garlic chives, salt, butter, and raw milk
  6. Using a potato masher, blend all ingredients together to a creamy consistency

 Serving Suggestion: Top with local Dominican cheese and crispy onions. Enjoy your meal!


Our Taino Farm style mangú on a bed of freshly picked greens with farm fresh scrambled eggs on top. Yum!