, , , , , , ,

Community Inspired Coconut Bouillabaisse

Here at Taino farms we have a great working relationship with the community and our local staff members. It is because of them that we are able to come to Los Brazos to work, learn, live, and integrate and because they mean so much to the success of the operation I wanted to show my appreciation in my own way.


Being a cook and food enthusiast I thought it appropriate to cook them an over the top meal.  Of course we are in their culture so the dish I decided to make for them had dominican flare.


Upon the farm we have an intricate aquaponics system running to produce certain foods in an organic and sustainable manner and one of the main proponents of that system in Tilapia. Tilapia byproducts become the food for the plants and the plants filter the water for the tilapia. It is an sustainable system that put Taino Farm ahead of others.


In celebration of both our staff and the products of this system I created baked tilapia filets, fish head soup with coconut bouillabaisse.



(for the full recipe please email me at tainofarm@gmail.com)


All parts of the tilapia were used and nothing was wasted in the creation of this dish. With any unused parts of the fish I made a simple fish broth in which we used to create future soups.


Inspiration for this meal comes from the local people of Los Brazos and the amazing system they help maintain that allows up a fruitful bounty. It is them we thank, them we celebrate and they who inspire things like this.  

, , , , ,

Raw Vegan Summery Cucumber Soup

Guess who got even more cucumbers from the harvest today?! This guy!! Luckily we are drawing to the end of the life span of the crop we have and will be turning the bed over to nitrogen fixers like white beans, but this mean we get to do another cucumber dish.

Now don’t pout, today’s dish is a twist on the light and summery Cucumber Soup!! Now while it may not be hot and sunny where you are right now, just place this blog in your back pocket and break it out for a summer picnic and surprise your friends with this cool and refreshing dish.

This dish is raw and vegan diet friendly, but will make others just as please.

Harvested every bit of this soup base from our garden at Taino Farm. We have Cucumbers, chives, garlic chives, sweet peppers, mint and sweet basil.

De-seed cucumbers and rough chop them along with the rest of the ingredients. Blend all together and let chill.  As a Taino twist we added a bit of coconut oil in the soup as well as drizzled some on top for that added sweetness.

Here is the final dish!!!

I hope you enjoy. A note should be added that while our version had both basil and mint, that you can very easily omit one or the other for a more singular flavor that accentuates just one herd at a time.

Let me know what you come up with. I would love to hear about twists, and I await your inspired creations.


, , , , ,

Sustainable Food Preservation Methods

Sustainability is a huge driving force for us here at Taino. I had mentioned our aquaponics system in a previous post but that ideal should never escape our minds.  Keeping this focus allows us to positively impact the land and lands surrounding us and finding creative and effective uses for our waste is a core component.

Today we will look at a few food storing methods that I have done here at the farm to keep our food supply sustainably and waste free.

Harvests sometimes yield more that we predicted (not a bad thing) but we then end up with a surplus of specific foods and having methods such as drying and pickling allows us to preserve them for longer periods of time. Below we will discuss some drying projects I have been working on (pickling to come in a future post).

This is our solar dehydrator. Basic in both its function and construction; it allows for the heat of the sun to extract the moisture from the plants and angles the rising moisture out to eliminate rotting.

The first crop to come to me in surplus was Thai Chilis. A tiny red chili that packs a surprising punch.Here at the farm they grow tremendously well and I used the preservation method of drying to make homemade crushed red thai chili peppers.

This turned out so well that I am now currently in the process of testing the drying capability of many of the herbs that grow here on the farm. (oregano, sweet basil, thai basil, mint, curry)

The current crop to come to me in a big enough surplus to dry was habanero peppers. These just came in and they are in the beginning stages, but as you can see I have chosen the hanging drying method for these.

A picture perfect plate of farm fresh greens, eggs, tomatoes and avocado.
, , , , , , , , ,

Nutrivore Eats

Taino Farm is a beautiful place to work and live. Sustainability is essential for success here because resources are precious and the margin for error is very small. Wasting time, money, water, etc. impacts the Taino Farm community in a big way. Sustainability in agriculture is quite a popular topic on the blogosphere these days but it never hit home for me until I came to the north coast of the Dominican Republic. In California, every type of food is available right at my finger tips. The concept of sustainability and protecting our resources (namely water!) is often discussed, but for me, there was no real weight behind the issue until I stepped outside of my all too familiar surroundings.

Processed with Moldiv

The concept of sustainability and my quest for nutrient dense food go hand in hand at the farm.  The food that grows the best on a permaculture farm is both nutrient dense, because it is happy in the soil, and has the lowest impact on the environment because the plants are using their resources efficiently.  This makes good nutrition choices much simpler. Instead of trying to hold onto this idea of good nutrition that was so vastly different at home, I remembered the main principals of what I tried to implement in California:
















The food options for a Nutrivore are numerous but aren’t a picture perfect fit for the standard Paleo diet. I know that I need to avoid gluten, sugar, dairy and poor quality fats above all else. I have a tendency to get bogged down in the tiny details of my ever changing diet.  But on the farm, it is quite easy to find what will bring the most vibrant health into my life. The freshest produce that has the most developed flavors are the basis of a Nutrivore diet.



So I decided to approach the “What should I eat” question in the simplest way possible. What are the prettiest veggies in our garden? We have eggplant, cucumber, green beans, peppers, pumpkin, and TONS of delicious greens – spicy, sweet and mild. Arugula, kale, mustard greens and cranberry hibiscus are the farm favorites! Also on the list for special treats and simple sugars to revitalize thirsty, sweaty farmers quickly are coconuts, plantains, cacao, and delicious tropical fruits like Abiyu and Mangos.




In California, my paleo diet consisted of high protein and low carb.  So far in the Dominican Republic, clean protein sources have been hard to come by. Luckily on the farm we have delicious pastured eggs and Tilapia from our aquaponics system. As part of the internship program, I spend half my time on Kite Beach, Cabarete at the Extreme Hotel where I eat at restaurants 1-2 meals per day. I have found that most lean animal proteins aren’t high quality and are most certainly covered in industrial seed oils and sauces that do not promote good health in my body. This does not go with the Nutrivore theme! Therefore…gasp…I have started eating beans and legumes to supplement my diet. Perhaps I am picking the lesser of two evils. I am pairing legumes with tons of anti-inflammatory foods and my body has been able to find some balance. Nutrition choices can be confusing especially when you have dietary restrictions. But, as Liz Wolfe says ” Get back to basics. Let intuition be your guide”.

What is nutrient dense, fresh, and grows right in front of my face?


A slightly hidden pumpkin










mmmmm Cacao

, , , , , ,

Why are People Obsessed with Coconuts?

The darling of the health and wellness industry is versatile, sweet, anti-inflammatory, and abundant here in the Dominican Republic. And why else are they so popular? First of all, coconuts include minerals to support hydration. This is key to maintaining your health in a tropical climate! Coconut also serves as an immunity booster. The anti-bacterial, anti-fungal and anti-viral activities of coconuts allow them to fight against common infections that attack the body. The best way to get the immune boosting benefits of coconut is by consuming both the flesh of the coconut and the water. And besides the health benefits, there’s the delicious taste!!!

At Taino Organic Farm we love to make coconut milk. This is a wonderful option for a dairy replacement that is home made, organic and nutrient dense. We use it in our coffee and as a base for smoothies, soups, cookies, ice cream and more. Coconut milk makes our food creamier and when you know all the benefits it has for your body, of course you will want to eat as much as possible!

11350106_10205327800692057_878393907_nHealth Benefits

  • Helps the body maintain proper blood sugar levels
  • Keeps blood vessels and skin elastic and flexible (contains 50{f2973bc577a195c35cdcad3730db5f6ced97ed67eb120151c538413472fe3d08} copper)
  • Strong bones (rich in phosphorus)
  • Relaxes nerves and muscles (magnesium)
  • It helps in weight control (fiber)
  • Reduces the risk of inflammation of the joints (selenium)
  • Lowers high blood pressure potassium
  • Supports prostate (mineral Zinc)

As nutrition junkies, we are living to create vibrant health! The Finca is delighted to share this simple, delicious, locally sourced recipe with you. So easy, so tasty and so healthy.

Coconut Milk Recipe

Yield: 24 oz depending on size of coconuts


  • Water and flesh from 3 coconuts (Ask a local to help open the coconuts as they know what they’re doing … keeping all of our fingers is important to us!)
  • Vanilla
  • Himalayan Salt


Simply combine all ingredients together and blend until desired consistency