Our first impressions on permaculture at Taino Farm:

When you come to the Taino farm in Los Brazos for the first time and moreover when you come from somewhere in central Europe, almost everything is new for you. What strikes you is how amazingly green all the plants and trees are and how quickly everything grows. The temperature of local fall is twenty degrees higher than what we are used to and as soon as you get out of the plane you are overwhelmed by the humidity you are faced with. However, a week later somehow it all seems natural to you, as well as getting up at the dawn. You get to learn a lot about the farm during just a week and so you can actually do things on your own. And if you have any doubts, you can always ask one of the locals who are working on the permaculture farm as they will willingly explain everything you need to know – well, if you can speak at least some Spanish:-)

Abiu fruit at taino farm

Abiu Fruit at Taino Farm

 

Local people are in general very easy-going, relaxed and always smiling which makes you smile too. Our usual day starts at dawn, we do some work in the garden as it is much cooler in the morning than it is during the day, then breakfast, some work in the house, time for a swim in the river, fun and time to get a bit lazy 🙂 and in the afternoon when it is breathable again, we do some work. For the most part we have been taking care of the Annual Garden, keeping the beds clean of weed, doing a lot of chopping and dropping (a permaculture technique covering the beds with branches so that the soil doesn’t get so dry quickly and the nutrient stay there), watering the plants if it doesn’t rain and planting new plants and seeds, mostly the sweet potatoes and cow peas.

planting cow pea seeds

Honza planting cow pea seeds in the Nursery

Planting oregano to deter mosquitos

Karin planting oregano to keep the mosquitos away by our hut

Our big project is also the new compost, which is taken very good care of as we want to get the best nutrient rich soil for our plants :-). We learned from Charlie, the permaculture designer that we can build a hot compost pile and in 16 – 30 days it will be ready to use! One of the great benefits of living on a farm is all the fresh fruit and vegetables you get to eat. There’s plenty of avocados, papayas, star fruits, abius (amazingly sweet fruit which we never heard of before), cherries, plantains, passion fruits, lemon mangosteins (little cherry-size a bit-sized sour mango), yuccas, pumpkins, sweet potatoes etc. And all that you get to eat. Fresh, healthy and sooo tasty. Yum! 🙂

Auyama pumpkin

Auyama pumpkin

Apart from all this, there is one little thing that saves you a lot of time – good gnomes which locals call “wiremen”. These strange creatures have always been present on this farm and they are always trying to help. Sometimes you catch a glimpse of them planting new seeds in the nursery or taking out the rubbish. They also like helping with preparing lunch meanwhile they themselves are not demanding at all when it comes to food. Apart from work they also love travelling  and thanks to yoga practice they don’t take up a lot of space in your luggage. That’s not all, since they never sleep they have enough time for practicing martial arts during the night so you don’t need to worry about your safety in their presence. Their help is simply invaluable and life on a farm goes really smoothly with them around. We are looking forward to you meeting them!

yoga at taino farm

Wiremen yoga: he needs to work on his flexibility.

wiremen at taino farm

The wiremen are especially helpful in the nursery because their little metal hands can plant seeds so fast!

the wiremen

The wiremen help even when you’re not looking!

Chali Project at Taino Farm – Sustainable Agriculture
To commemorate Canada day, Chali (chaliproject.comaccompanied Taino Farm’s Charlie Durrant for an afternoon of compost turning and permaculture exploration.
Canadian Chali Volunteer, Beth Storey, with a Masters in Agriculture Science, describes the journey as an eye-opening experience. We were able to view the integration of environment and agriculture whilst learning about the importance of permaculture in the Dominican Republic and temperate climates.
The Chali Project works “with girls and women who seek an alternative path to the prevalent sex trade in the Dominican Republic. Through an alternative means to make a living, entrepreneurial artisania can provide integrity and a creative pathway to financial independence. The Chali Project was birthed out of the need to follow artisans through training, help them receive supplies, and deliver market driven products to a reliable buyer.”
Chali Project at Taino Farm

Chali Project at Taino Farm

Chali Project at Taino Farm

Chali Project at Taino Farm

 
During our exploration, our tastebuds were introduced to Cranberry Hibiscus trees, sour lemon-drop like fruit, yellow tomatoes, moringa, and tropical spinach. It was definitely a full-FILLING trip.
Fun Fact: the simple act of shoving moringa branches in the ground creates more moringa trees.
It’s great to see how agriculture can be done in a sustainable manner in the tropics. By giving back to our communities through environmental education, skills based learning, knowledge share, and empowerment of women, we can make a huge change amongst the families in small communities like Los Brazos.
It was great to charlamos (spanish for ‘we chat’) with Charlie and Chali. When two great projects come together, awesome things can happen. We hope to hear more from the Chali girls in the future!
Chali Project at Taino Farm

Chali Project at Taino Farm